Treeline | Adrenaline for your Sales Force

Soaring to
New Heights

Not getting noticed? What makes a sales resume stand out?

04.10.09   |   Job Search & Career   |   Amanda Musto, Marketing Manager at Treeline Incorporated

We all know in today's world finding the 'right' job can be difficult.  Many people ask, "What do I have to do to in order to stand out?  What are other people doing out there and how can I be different?"  In order to shop yourself around effectively, there is a standard resume format but there are many myths surrounding resumes;  "How long should it be?  What content should I put in there?  Do I have to list every role I ever held?"

 

 

Many career seekers want to put as much information down as possible, but you should only focus on what is important - the pertinent information.  This is what will make an employer interested in speaking with you.  You want your resume to sell your skills in full force to make you stand out from the pack.  In order to do this effectively -the question that you want to ask yourself is; "What have I accomplished in each role that I have held?"

 

 

 

 

Accomplishments can mean many different things.  Essentially it all depends on what message you are trying to deliver.  For an example, the dictionary* states an accomplishment to be:

 

 

 


  1. An act or instance of carrying into effect; fulfillment.

  2. Something done admirably or creditably






  3.  
  4.  
  5.  
  6.  
  7. Anything accomplished; deed; measurement

 

 

 

 

 

 

Makes sense right?  So, how do we highlight what we have accomplished in a resume?  There are essentially two ways to highlight what you have accomplished, the scope of your job, or... plainly put, numbers!   If you are describing a non-sales role, you can highlight your role with key words - such as 'challenges', 'actions',' results', 'implemented',' improved', 'made', 'developed', 'handled', 'responsible for,' etc... these are only a few ways to identify quantifiable accomplishments.  For an example,

 

 

 


  • Created and designed website to better serve current and prospective clients in all aspects of marketing, service issues, and 24/7 customer service help.






  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • Responsible for all aspects of employment (Hiring, training, coaching, termination).

  • Developed key relationships with C-Level Executives within a Nationwide Territory.

 

 

 

From a sales perspective, any hiring manager or decision maker will be looking for numbers that will highlight your goals, quotas and achievements.  Numbers are not always about what you have accomplished but also the means to achieve the goal...in other words, activity.  For an example:

 

 

 


  • Averaged 75+ cold calls per day to Managers, Vice Presidents and C-Level Executives

  • Average 10 face to face presentations per week within a New England Territory.

  • 2005- Presidents Club recipient

  • Employee of the month, 10/07, 11/07, 2/08, 5/08

 

 

Another way to highlight your accomplishments would be in highlighting your education - whether it is academically, athletically or extracurricular activities - these can all be selling points, especially for hiring managers.  Were you a 3-sport athlete? Have you earned a varsity letter? Were you part of a Math or Science club? A member of a Sorority or Fraternity?  What about your class rank?  Are you part of fundraising or charitable events?  Marathon Runner?   Did you work while you were in school or perhaps 100% self financed your schooling?  These are all excellent conversation starters.  Don't assume that a hiring manager knows who you are.  Showing them that you are passionate, hard working and successful is positive and it will come across during an interview.  

 

 

 

Highlighting your experiences and skills to prospective employers will separate you from your competition.  Remember work hard and work smart!  If you have any questions, please feel free to email me at DeMelo@Treeline-Inc. or contact Treeline, Inc at 781-876-8100

 

 

 

*Random House Dictionary, (C) Random House, 2009

 

comments powered by Disqus